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The Anti-sleeve Crusade

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Today we have a slightly different kind of post – more tutorial than project log or pattern review. Herein you will find suggestions for altering a shirt with sleeves into a sleeveless one and more insight into my mental processes while sewing than is advisable.

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Cat to annoy not provided

Step One: Clean out your closet and get annoyed.

I recently regrouped my closet after the stunning revelation that professional attire which is comfortable for teaching is not necessarily professional attire in which you can comfortably haul document boxes up and down a ladder. Shocking, yes I know. This minor regrouping, however, meant I finally confronted some problem blouses I have been deliberately ignoring.

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Adorable, no? It was a one of those $5 finds in Target clearance that it takes a stronger woman than me to resist. There are very practical reasons that I don’t make it to Target very often. But this adorable blouse which I earnestly love – the color, the details, most of the fit –  has a dark secret. I can’t lift my arms to shoulder level while wearing it.

Shut up, it was cute and $5. We all make decisions we regret.
What follows is the resentful confrontation between my “No Blouse Left Behind” policy and and the “It’s Not Staying In This Closet If I Can’t Wear It” policy.

Step Two: Recklessly Unpick the Sleeve Seam.

Well you don’t need to be reckless about it. I suppose “patiently” or “painstakingly” would be acceptable adjectives too. I won’t police your moods and methods. But I will acknowledge that there is some risk to this step – you can tell by looking at the sleeve seam what the shoulders will look like without the sleeve attached, but it may not be to your liking once you’ve done it. In my case, I ended up with the makings of a totally wearable sleeveless blouse.

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Step Three: Finish Your New Armholes

This is a multi-step process. Firstly, I strongly suggest you acquire some of this:

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This is rayon bias binding, and I have no idea how I could stand to sew clothing before discovering it. This stuff is vastly superior to the polyeser bias binding that you can pick up in packages  at the big box stores. It is also a kajillion times better than making your own bias binding, because who wants to waste good sewing time that way? This stuff is thin and flexible and drapes just as well as your fabric. It finishes seams, it makes hemming so easy, it just generally makes your finished product easier to create and with a cleaner finish. Seriously, rayon bias-binding is magic. I’m trying not to write odes here. No one wants that.

Lacking the magical bias binding, you could use a flexible length of ribbon, make your own bias binding, use the terrible packaged stuff, or fold the edge of the armhole under twice. These are all perfectly workable options, but in my book, this approach is vastly easier and vastly superior in results.

So, Step 3.1: With the right side facing, align the bias binding with the unfinished edge of the armhole (created when you unpicked the sleeve seam). Stitch together close to the edge – between 1/4 and 1/8 inch – trying to be consistent. It should look like the one on the right when you finish.

Step 3.2: Press the binding away from the body of the blouse.DSCN0179

Step 3.3: Fold the binding to the wrong side and press so you can’t see the binding from the right side. Seriously, doing this in two steps will give you a cleaner result and save you headaches and burnt fingers.

Step 3.4: With the right side facing, stitch your new hem in place, 1/4 inch from the edge. You have made a little fabric sandwich to enclose all the loose ends of the armhole. Good Work!

Step 3.5: Press your new hem again to set the stitches and get rid of any odd little ripples that may have developed. Cackle in triumph if you feel so led.

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Step 4: Feel Smug
Enjoy your new sleeveless blouse and your increased ability to fly kites and direct aircraft to land. Go you! Beware the addictive power of removing annoying sleeves and try to remember that cold weather will return eventually. You are going to want some clothing with sleeves then.

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About autumnyarn

I am a graduate student who sews and knits to satisfy the creative urge, makes clothing to keep the creativity useful, and writes about it to de-stress.

2 responses »

  1. creative pixie

    Good work, I must tackle a few items in my wardrobe.

    Reply
  2. That is a cute top (and I love hug snug for hemming skirts and making waist stays). Cap sleeve is another option, I once used this tute: http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=134335.msg1315557..#axzz38pcWopfb

    Reply

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