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Zinnia Skirt

In the last post, I mentioned working on a Zinnia skirt from Colette Patterns during that ridiculously cold streak. Sewing chiffon feels absurd when the thermometer hovers around zero. Now that the weather is evening out to more typical DC winter temperatures, I’ve been wearing the skirt with cozy sweaters. The finished product is comfy, and it looks adorable with both a heavy sweater or a tank top. I think we have a year-round skirt here (success!).

flower zinnia 5

Photo-taking credit goes to my helpful and notoriously modest roommate – the one with opposible thumbs

I got the pdf version of the Zinnia pattern, printed it out and pieced it together. Of the pdf patterns that I have assembled, this one was easy to put together accurately. The skirt pattern is nothing earth shattering, but it is well-designed and simple to work with. The pleats are intelligently placed, giving the skirt fullness without being too fluffy (fluffy skirts are highly objectionable). The pattern comes in two lengths: knee length and just below knee length. I made the knee length version,but next time I might shorten it further. The pattern calls for a button to close the waistband above the zipper, but I used a hook and eye instead.

flower zinnia 1

The pattern includes optional features like patch pockets or side seam pockets and belt loops. I forwent all of these in favor of maintaining my sanity when confronted with chiffon. The pattern directions walk you through working with a lining and adding pleats at the same time; the most important thing is treating the lining and the top layer as one piece of fabric throughout. This lovely camel chiffon with the little white and red flowers came from the PA Fabric Outlet trip. It is a very soft chiffon, and I knew it was destined for a skirt as soon as I saw it.

flower zinnia 3

I found the chiffon fussy to work with, but not particularly difficult to use. Chiffon simply requires patience. It is prone to slipping and stretching out of shape, but a careful approach while handling it prevents most of these problems. I didn’t treat the fabric with any stiffener before working with it. I  did trace the pattern pieces onto the fabric before cutting them out, which helped significantly. Once there is at least a double thickness of chiffon involved, my sewing machine had no problem working with it. But when there was only one thickness of chiffon, specifically when stay-stitching the waist edge, it slid all over the place. I didn’t worry about this much as that mess is hidden in the seam allowance.

I am very pleased with the skirt, which shouldn’t be surprising. By the time my projects make it to the blog, I tend to have worked out whatever may have been frustrating me along the way. I do have a few hibernating projects that I am not speaking to at the moment. They know what they did. There is another, mostly finished Zinnia skirt in the works, at least on baby sweater, and I suspect a coat pattern will be cut out very soon. This year I am chasing consistency and plan to make at least one blog post a month. Fingers crossed.

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About autumnyarn

I am a graduate student who sews and knits to satisfy the creative urge, makes clothing to keep the creativity useful, and writes about it to de-stress.

5 responses »

  1. Absolutely lovely! This is one of my favorite skirt patterns, simple as it is, and your version is on the prettiest I’ve seen. The print of that chiffon is just adorable. What a great find! I can’t wait to see your next Zinnia.

    Reply
    • Thank you! It is definitely a well-designed and versatile skirt pattern. I have so many versions with different fabric combinations in my head because the pattern is so inspiring. Now if Spring would just show up around here I could justify sewing them!

      Reply
  2. Love this post! I’m thinking of making this skirt, it’s so pretty!

    Reply
  3. Pingback: The Zinnia (Skirt) Blooms Again | Autumn Yarn

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